Transcript: Together We Can Be Ready To Read video

View the video: Together We Can Be Ready To Read

The transcript begins.

You hear instrumental music playing in background during the entire video.

You see images of toddlers and preschoolers, both with and without adults.

You see the image of the words “Talk together.”

You hear a woman say:

Talk

You see the image of the words “Sing together.”

You hear a woman say:

Sing

You see the image of the words “Read together.”

You hear a woman say:

Read

You see the image of the words “Write together.”

You hear a woman say:

Write

You see the image of the words “Play together.”

You hear a woman say:

Play

Together we can be ready to read.

By talking, singing, reading, writing and playing together, you can help your child get ready to read.

You see the image of the words “Talk together.”

You hear a toddler say:

Talk with me

You see a mother interacting with her daughter.

You hear a woman say:

Your child wants to hear your voice.

By talking to your child and asking her open-ended questions, you’ll help her hear how language works.

Together, you are connecting words to objects and ideas.

The more words your child hears, the more words she’ll understand when she begins to speak and read.

You see the image of the words “Sing together.”

You hear a toddler say:

Sing with me

You see a mother driving a car and singing with two children in the back seat who are singing and gesturing.

You hear a woman say:

Singing is a great way for your child to feel and hear the rhythm of language.

Language is often slowed down in songs, making it easier to hear the individual sounds and syllables.

You see the image of the words “Read together.”

You hear a toddler say:

Read with me

You see a father reading to his son.

You hear a woman say:

By reading together, your child will start connecting the words that you say to the print on the page.

If you read with your child, he is more likely to want to read on his own.

Sharing books can help your child explore new ideas, expand his knowledge, and increase his vocabulary.

You see the words “Write together.”

You hear a toddler say:

Write with me

You see a woman and a child playing with sidewalk chalk.

You hear a woman say:

Scribbling and drawing are the beginning of writing.

Shapes become letters, letters become words, and words become language.

Writing helps children learn that letters and words have soundS and meaning.

You see the image of the words “Play together.”

You hear a toddler say:

Play with me

You see an elderly man playing with two children and their toys.

 

You hear a woman say:

Play is vital to reading readiness.

Play can expand children’s imaginations and vocabularies, build an understanding of words and ideas, encourage problem solving, and inspire creative thinking.

You see a series of images of people using metro public libraries.

You hear a woman say:

At your Twin Cities metro public libraries, we’re here to support your child’s learning.

Our libraries have books, toys, music and programs designed specifically for young children and families.

Our staff is here to help you find these resources and guide you as you help your child get ready to read.

You see the images of the following phrases:

“Metro Public Libraries”

“Together we can be ready to read”

“MELSA metro public libraries Anoka County Library, Carver County Library, Dakota County Library, Hennepin County Library, Ramsey County Library, Saint Paul Public Library, Scott County Library, Washington County Library”