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The accidental Buddhist : mindfulness, enlightenment, and sitting still
Moore, Dinty W.
Adult Nonfiction BQ5405.M656 1997

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From Publishers' Weekly:

Moore (The Emperor's Virtual Clothes: The Naked Truth About Internet Culture) offers a lighthearted account of how, in 1995, he set out to find out why Buddhism seemed to be taking America by storm. Along the way, he becomes a practicing Buddhist. With good humor and a penchant for not taking life too seriously, Moore travels to a variety of locations in the U.S. where Buddhism has thrived and become a part of the culture. In a chapter titled "Buddha 101: Stumbling Up Monkey Mind Mountain," Moore describes his weekend at a Zen monastery in upstate New York where he and other participants learn the basic lessons of mindfulness and sitting meditation. Other chapters find Moore discovering key principles of Buddhism, such as the struggle to give up attachment to material things ("Why Do Tibetan Buddhists Have Such Trouble with Their Vacuum Cleaners?: They Lack Attachments") and zazen, or sitting meditation ("Eat Your Rice, Wash Your Bowl, and Just Sit: Studying with the Seven-Year-Old Master"). In a final chapter, Moore remarks that his Buddhism, even though he calls himself a "fairly lousy Buddhist," has made him aware that he should "live my life according to the principles of kindness, compassion, and awareness." Moore's hilarious and sometimes irreverent look at Buddhism is a perfect primer for the budding Buddhist. Second serial rights to Tricycle. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

From Library Journal:

In this succinct reading by Jack Hawkins, author Moore relates how persistent dissatisfaction and a hollowness in his life led him, a college writing professor, to investigate the resurgence of Buddhism (Algonquin, 1997). His self-styled American Buddhism Project led him to visit several diverse monasteries and retreats and delve into the wealth of contemporary literature. His insouciant account of these experiences makes the oftentimes impenetrable concepts of Buddhism accessible to the reader and contains striking, and important, parallels and contrasts between his own Catholic upbringing and ancient Buddhist traditions. Highly recommended.‘Linda Bredengerd, Univ. of Pittsburgh Lib., Bradford, Pa. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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